Tips for Parents & Teachers: How to Criticize Kids Constructively

Criticism is one word that raises your eyebrows and sulks you down. Arguably, it has no positive connotation for most of us. So, it is never received in a healthy way either. So the matter of concern is, when we as adults can’t handle criticism, what about the kids, who are subject to severe and regular criticism. Everybody who is somebody in their life, comments and takes the liberty to pass judgement on their each and every act, unfortunately most of which is in critical form.

So how to safeguard them or how to prepare them so that this unwarranted criticism does more good than harm to them.

Criticism, or if they can be called Feedback, are both constructive and destructive. Receiving feedback is a skill, and like most skills, it requires practice, and a willingness to change and improve. Most children get plenty of practice. Ironically, adults need to help them make that practice count – by giving them feedback on how they handle criticism.

Feedback – both positive and negative – is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to take a feedback in a positive manner, is to adopt a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

But, not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

A growth mindset is the best gift we can give our children. Thus armed, they can be brave in the face of constructive criticism, believing it can make them better, stronger and smarter. They won’t need us to safeguard their interest because, given a growth mindset, kids can handle the truth all by themselves.

So, what to do?

Don’t hesitate to criticize:

Many kids have trouble hearing feedback because they don’t experience it often enough. While it’s natural to want to protect children from pain, when we protect our kids from criticism or focus excessively on praise, we push them toward a fixed mindset.

Stop constant praise:

An effusive praise may encourage a fixed mindset and consequently discourage children from taking on new challenges. Worse, it can deflate, rather than shore up, self-esteem in some kids. Children need to get used to hearing constructive feedback, and it’s our job to teach them how.

Mind your body language:

Non-verbal communication is part of delivering feedback, and can help kids hear it more effectively. Uncross your arms, get down on kids’ level, smile and keep your face relaxed. If you are tense when you hand out criticism, they will be tense when they receive it.

Switch up your pronouns:

Instead of framing feedback in terms of “I’m so proud of you”, turn the statement and anchor feedback in the pronoun “you,” as in, “You should be proud of yourself,” or “What did you feel best about?” or “What one thing would you like to change?”

Empower for change:

Lessen your control and hand power over to the children and help them adjust their efforts to use feedback effectively. Ask, “Is that how you’d hoped this would turn out?” or “What would you do differently the next time?” Help them see the way forward with comments like, “How do you think you could take this project from good to awesome?”

Set new goals after a big failure. Once they have picked themselves up, help them pick some new goals based on what they have learned from the situation at hand. Their goals should be their own, devised by them, based on their experience.

Criticism comes to everyone, eventually. It’s inescapable, and more relevantly, it’s a necessary part of growing up. As we can’t protect children from it, the best we can do is ensure that they are equipped with the emotional fortitude and strength of character they will need to forge ahead, stronger, smarter and braver for the experience.

5 Tips for Selecting a Tutoring Center for Kids With Learning Problems

It is obvious that most parents desire their children to have a high success rate in academics. However, parents feel confused when they discover that their child suffers from learning disability. However, feeling disillusioned is not a solution to the problem. Rather, selecting a tutoring center that have certified and trainer instructors to take care of children with learning disabilities is a step in the right direction.

As a parent, you need to select a tutoring center for kids with learning disabilities carefully. Some quick tips to help you make the right selection are as follows:

  • Check the infrastructure: A center might proclaim a lot of positive things for itself, but you need to evaluate whether it has the facilities it promises. You should try to find out if the center is well-equipped to handle the particular learning disability that your child is affected with.
  • Check the teacher-student ratio: You need to check how the tutoring center assigns an instructor for every student or a group of students. This is important because children with learning disabilities have different learning needs than their regular peers and should be partnered with such an instructor who has adequate experience in teaching the child with care, love and empathy.
  • Opt for several classes a week: As students with such difficulties need more attention, it is imperative to choose a tutoring center that offers several classes in a week. This way, your child can have better practice of whatever is being taught and retain the lessons better.
  • Check if the curriculum is structured to benefit your kid the most: Most of times, kids suffering from learning disabilities find it difficult to cope with studies. So, try to get your kid enrolled into a center that tries to strengthen the basic skills of your child or the areas he is weak in, and eventually moves on to the harder concepts. You should also find if the tutoring center offers personal, one-on-one attention or a group-oriented program, or a blend of both. While some students can work well with others in group sessions, some others, especially those struggling with their lessons would benefit more from private tutoring. Since several centers provide either one or the other, or have different fee structures depending on which type of program you select, you should check to make sure that your child can indeed benefit from such learning programs.
  • Are the parents involved? Centers that encourage involvement of parents have a better chance of addressing the problem of learning disability. If parents are involved in the learning sessions often, they can guide their kids in a similar direction even at home, thus making the learning process more effective.

So, be selective while choosing a tutoring center for your kid who has learning problems.